Rendering by Rockhill

WINTER 
    SCHOOL

Kansas, and Douglas County in particular, were born in strife and bloodshed, so it is hoped that the [visitor] will have both charity and understanding for the efforts of the pioneers in their struggles to establish rural education in what was then a troubled and sparsely settled area.”

-Goldie Piper Daniels, 1976.

Rural Schools and Schoolhouses of Douglas County

Curriculum

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Museum of

Education Foundations

The Winter School acts as a traditional museum where you can glimpse into the life of a one-room school through items on display; it also acts as an interactive, experimental museum where we use the pioneer materials as a starting point to explore the origins and evolutions of our current school system. Through interactive activities designed for the whole family we explore questions about goals, curriculum, teaching strategies and the dynamic nature of knowledge.

Classes by

The Lawrence Laboratory

 

While classes are no longer the centerpiece of the building, The Winter School will once again hold classes open to the community. They will be hosted by The Lawrence Laboratory which runs informal, low-commitment and low-cost classes. Classes are one session only and range between 60-90 minutes. Courses are taught by members of the community and include a wide variety of subjects from nutrition to political cartoons to dollar bill origami. Every class is one of a kind. Join us! 

Group No. 70:

Education Club

At the Winter School we want to provide a lively, communal space for people to think about and talk about topics related to teaching, learning and knowledge. Group No.70 is an inclusive education club providing regular and structured meetings throughout the year. Topics are varied and the theme is related to the current museum exhibition. Meetings are informal and participatory with members sharing what they have been working on as well as posing questions for further exploration. Drinks provided. 

View Classes

Kansas, and Douglas County in particular, were born in strife and bloodshed, so it is hoped that the [visitor] will have both charity and understanding for the efforts of the pioneers in their struggles to establish rural education in what was then a troubled and sparsely settled area.”

-Goldie Piper Daniels, 1976.

Rural Schools and Schoolhouses of Douglas County